The world needs your message.

It’s been eight weeks of quarantine, eight weeks of completely re-branding and re-inventing myself professionally, eight weeks of being smacked in the face on a daily basis with my complete and utter incompetence.

Every day a new lesson.
Every day a new discovery.
Every day a new failure.
Every day a new (albeit sometimes microscopic) success.

I’ve been going on Facebook Live every weekday at 10 am. I’m doing this to test equipment, get my reps in, keep my voice active, show up for my people, and just generally stay sane. It gives me structure, it gives me interaction, it gives me you.

I am so deeply grateful to all of those who show up, whether from time to time, every single day, or catch the replay later. I am grateful for those who like and love and comment and question and laugh and cry. I am grateful for people who send me texts and messages offline and cheer me on for the next discovery I made about my camera or my microphone or lighting or my content or my emotions.

Yesterday, I gave my first ever virtual keynote to Inc Magazine. It was, in a word, exhausting. I sat on my stool in front of a lens and talked into it for an hour, pausing from time to time to take questions and comments, using technology in a way I’ve never done before and certainly hadn’t mastered yet. When I was done, I slumped down, exhaled loudly, and thought, “Shit, I need to do more core work,” because all I could feel was my abdominal wall give out under the pressure of sitting up and emoting for an hour.

I managed to pull it off. The client was thrilled. “So engaging! So energetic! So interactive! So professional!” But I am currently the Wizard of Oz, and that’s an energy suck of the highest magnitude.

 

(See the photos of the front of the house refinement vs. the back of the house mayhem.) Mayham set up of video conferences during quarantine.

Don’t be fooled that everyone who looks together is, in fact, together. We are all just trying to make it work. We are all exhausted.

Over dinner, I whined to my eldest about how spent I felt, how I was an empty shell of myself, and how I didn’t know if I could do this for the next 18-14 months. He said, “It was the first time you did it. The first time you do anything is hard. Transition is exhausting. It will get easier. Stick with it. You will figure it out. People need your message, especially now.”

So, I’m here to pass this message on to all of you.

Transition is exhausting. And we are all — every single one of us — in transition right now.

And we are all — every single one of us — figuring it out.

The world needs your message. Give it to them.